Passover Books

(Page 1)

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For Family Haggadahs, go to the Siddurim, Haggadahs, and Other Prayerbooks Page

For books containing all the Jewish holidays, go to The Holiday Collection Page

For more books about the Exodus, go to the Stories About Moses, Miriam, and Aaron Page.

For Passover videos, go to the Video Collection Page





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Passover Books ... (Page 1) (Page 2) (Page 3) (Page 4) (Page 5) (Page 6) (Page 7)


Jewish Holiday Books ... Jewish Holiday Collections (Page 1) (Page 2) (Page 3) (Page 4) (Page 5) | Shabbat Books (Page 1) (Page 2) (Page 3) (Page 4) | Rosh Hashanah & Yom Kippur Books (Page 1) (Page 2) (Page 3) | Sukkot & Simchat Torah Books (Page 1) (Page 2) (Page 3) | Hanukkah Books (Page 1) (Page 2) (Page 3) (Page 4) (Page 5) (Page 6) (Page 7) (Page 8) (Page 9) (Page 10) (Page 11) (Page 12) (Page 13) (Page 14) (Page 15) (Page 16) (Page 17) (Page 18) | Tu B'Shevat & Lag B'Omer Books (Page 1) | Purim Books (Page 1) (Page 2) (Page 3) | Passover Books (Page 1) (Page 2) (Page 3) (Page 4) (Page 5) (Page 6) (Page 7) | Shavout Books (Page 1)

Easy Reader and Picture Books ... Jewish Children's Books (General) | Jewish Board Books | Biblical Stories for Children | Jewish Holiday Books | Jewish Family Cookbooks | Folktales and Talmudic Stories for Children | Jewish Life Books (Mitzvot, Keeping Kosher, etc.) | Jewish Life Cycle Books | Family Haggadahs | Children's Prayerbooks | Introductory Hebrew Books | Jewish History and Historical Fiction Picture Books | Israel Books

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Sammy Spider's First Passover

By Sylvia Rouss
Sammy Spider watches longingly as the Shapiro family celebrates Passover. He wants to help Josh find the afikomen but his mother reminds him, "Spiders don't celebrate Passover. Spiders spin webs. His first attempt yields some surprising results.

Description from Publisher


Sammy Spider returns for another adventure with the Shapiro family. As Sammy watches the Shapiros prepare for Passover, he decides that he wants to celebrate Passover too. But as she always does, Sammy's mother tells him, "Spiders don't celebrate Passover. Spiders spin webs." She trys to teach Sammy how to make his own web, but he is too distracted by the Seder going on in the Shapiro household. Finally, Sammy finds a creative way to help Josh find the afikomen and finds out he can celebrate Passover too. Like all the books in the Sammy Spider series, Sammy Spider's First Passover teaches a concept in addition to the Jewish holiday. In this case, different shapes. Children will delight in the continuing saga of their friend Sammy Spider!

Lori's Description

Sammy Spider's Passover Fun Book

By Sylvia Rouss
Sammy Spider presents Passover through mazes, puzzles, and more. With pictures to color and crafts to make. A great seder gift.

Description from Publisher


This enjoyable companion to Sammy Spider's First Passover features coloring pages, games, puzzles, hidden objects, crafts, cooking, and more. Parents can use this to tie in to the Sammy the Spider story, or alone as a way to get children excited about Passover.

Lori's Description

P Is for Passover : A Holiday Alphabet Book

By Tanya Lee Stone
P is for Passover
Or Pesach, some say,
We celebrate freedom
On this holiday

In this new shaped alphabet book, families will enjoy learning about Passover! Every page contains a letter of the alphabet along with sweet, rhyming text that corresponds with each letter. And as an added bonus, at the end of the book is the complete story of Passover. This is a perfect introduction to the holiday!

Description from Publisher


The celebration of Passover is highlighted by each letter of the alphabet in this wonderful storybook. The alphabet addresses both the parts of the Seder and the story of Exodus. Each letter's treatment involved a short four-line rhyme explaining the term. The bright illustrations reflect a modern Jewish family's joyous celebrations. Overall, an excellent book for children learning the alphabet and for those reading alound together.

Lori's Description

The Matzah Man :
A Passover Story

By Naomi Howland
In this lively adaptation of “The Gingerbread Boy,” a bold little man made of matzah jumps out of the baker’s oven and leads him and everyone in the neighborhood—all of whom are preparing for Passover—on a merry chase. With colossal chutzpah, the Matzah Man taunts Cousin Tillie as she is cooking brisket, Auntie Bertha trying on her new spring shoes, and Grandpapa Solly making gefilte fish. He at last arrives on the doorstep of clever Mendel Fox, who offers him a hiding place under the Passover matzah cover—and when the seder meal begins, that’s the end of the Matzah Man! As she did in Latkes, Latkes, Good to Eat, Naomi Howland has created a humorous tale, charmingly illustrated, that overflows with holiday festivity.

Description from Publisher


The author of Latkes, Latkes, Good to Eat is back with another wonderful adaptation of a classic fairy tale. In this version of The Gingerbread Man, a shaped piece of matzah escapes from the baker and runs into several members of the town. Each person (or animal) has a different use for the Matzah Man, but he instead taunts them as he runs away. Eventually, the Matzah Man runs past Mendel Fox's house with almost the entire town chasing behind. Mendel Fox comes up with a creative way to "catch" the Matzah Man. Bright detailed illustrations enhance a wonderful story. Includes a glossary of Passover terminology. An excellent Passover story!

Lori's Description

The Little Red Hen and the Passover Matzah

By Leslie Kimmelman
Oy gevalt! The Little Red Hen likes baking matzah, but she's not so crazy about doing everything herself. Would it be too much to ask her friends Dog, Horse, and Sheep to help plant and harvest some wheat for the delicious Passover treat? Couldn't they at least help schlep the wheat to the mill? In this rollicking version of a favorite folktale, a harried, hardworking hen finds the true meaning of Passover. A recipe for matzah, a glossary of Yiddish words, and a note on Passover traditions is included.

Description from Publisher


The classic tale about teamwork gets the Passover treatment in this delightful picture book. "Oy gevalt!" The Little Red Hen notices that Passover is not far away and determines that she has a lot of work to do to make sure she has fresh matzah for her Passover Seder. But each time she asks her barnyard friends for some help, they turn her down. So she schleps and kvetches as she plants the seeds, harvests the wheat, mills it into flour, and diligently works to bake her matzah. But in this version of the story, her friends do not go hungry, because The Little Red Hen is still a mensch who cannot let her friends go hungry during the Passover Seder. Leslie Kimmelman's delightful storytelling interspersed with Yiddish terms will keep children on the edge of their seats. Paul Meisel's hilarous illustrations beautifully complement the tale. This book will be an annual favorite for preschool and elementary age children alike!

Lori's Description

Wonders And Miracles : A Passover Companion

By Eric A. Kimmel
Kimmel gloriously celebrates the Passover Seder, an evening of observances, history, remembrances, and family sharing. Using the Haggadah, or "the telling," as a guide, he weaves together storytelling, narrative, recipes, songs, and prayers. Contributors include Nina Jaffe, Debbie Friedman, and Sadie Rose Weilerstein. Kimmel provides insightful explanations about why the Seder is held and why questions are asked and why certain foods are eaten or not eaten, and he embraces both traditional and modern practices. The marvelous selection of art--paintings, photographs, artifacts, and illustrations from historical Haggadahs--illuminates each step in the service. Hebrew prayers are transliterated and translated and recipes include both Ashkenazic and Sephardic favorites. Both the presentation of information and the overall design attest to the careful and loving attention given to every detail. This inviting, handsome, and informative compendium should find a place of honor in every library.

Description from School Library Journal

Starred Review
There are many Passover books, but this one is exceptionally handsome and will be especially useful. Unlike many volumes that simply focus on the service, this uses the seder as a hub, with spokes of poetry, story, and song extending from it. Not only has Kimmel compiled these works, which include everything from a tale about the "Jewish Tom Thumb" and stories based on Jewish commentaries to delicious-sounding recipes, he has also added some of his own work and, of course, has written the main body of the text. His writing shines as he ably explains the holiday, its customs, and rituals in language simple enough for children yet layered to keep the attention of teens and adults. Matching his words is well chosen, beautifully reproduced artwork, mostly historical, with much of it seeming timeless in the oversize, gilt-garnished format. It's an inviting volume that can be used before the seder as well as during it, in conjunction with the Haggadah. In time the snowy pages may become finger marked from use, but that will only make this volume lovelier.

Description from Booklist

An elegant volume with art and text that spans 3,000 years, four continents, and fifteen countries. Passover is a beloved holiday that millions of people from all over the world have celebrated for centuries. And the customs and rituals that are practiced today are a reflection of those many people, places, and times that came before. Now, in a rich and fascinating compilation, award-winning writer Eric A. Kimmel presents this ancient festival through stories, songs, poems, prayers, and commentary, which make this timeless, ever-changing holiday understandable and relevant to today's readers. Here is a book for the whole family to read before or during the holiday.

Description from Manufacturer

Nachshon, Who Was Afraid to Swim: A Passover Story

By Deborah Bodin Cohen
The biblical legend of the brave boy who was the first to step into the sea when the waters parted for Moses will inspire children to examine and deal with some of their own fears. A wonderful story for Passover!

Description from Publisher

Cohen succeeds in transporting the Exodus story to a personal scale without robbing it of significance. Jago's highly stylized...pictures are handsome and heartfelt: his gold-hued palette and mural-like compositions convey the heat and oppressiveness of Egypt, while his elaborately textured (and seemingly handmade) surfaces make the pages feel burnished by the forces of history and faith.

Description from Publishers Weekly

Cohen has successfully fictionalized the scant biblical account and embellished the midrash to create a child-friendly picture book about overcoming fear, trusting in God, and believing in oneself...The digitally prepared, mixed-media illustrations...complement and enhance the text marvelously. A wonderful, unique addition.

Description from School Library Journal
Let My Babies Go! (Rugrats)
Let My Babies Go! : A Passover Story (Rugrats)
Passover is a dumb holiday! declares Angelica. Not so, cries Tommy's Grandpa Boris. Before long, the Rugrats are caught up in Grandpa Boris's retelling of the Passover story, with Angelica imagining herself as the first female pharaoh -- and Tommy as Moses, pleading with her to "Let my babies go!" In the end, everyone agrees that Passover is a wonderful time for families to celebrate together. Pass the matzo!

Description from Publisher

When Angelica complains about Passover, Grandpa Boris tells retells the story of the Exodus in true Rugrats style. The story is sanitized a bit (Pharoah lets the Hebrews go before the last plague because he realizes Moses means business, the Egyptians don't drown in the Red Sea because they swim back to shore, etc.), but children won't notice the difference because they'll be too engaged in the illustrations of their favorite Rugrats characters acting out the Biblical tale.

Lori's Description

A Pickles Passover

By Richie Chevat
Boris Pickles leads the Seder and guides the participants through the special story of freedom as the Rugrats celebrate Passover. Then it's time for the children to search for the "afikoman, " a piece of matzoh that is hidden before the Seder begins. Who will find it?

Description from Publisher


In this picture book, the Rugrats gang is celebrating the Passover Seder led by Grandpa Boris. He tells them about the exodus from Egypt, but the kids imagine things slightly different from how they took place (i.e., a "Matzah King" drive-through fast food stand, pyramids made out of large Legos). When they are told that it is time to search for the afikomen, the kids instead start looking for an "awful comb" instead. The hilarious antics of the Rugrats gang will be a great way to introduce the customs of the Passover Seder to preschoolers.

Lori's Description

Reading Railroad: No Matzoh for Me!

By Nancy Krulik
Sammy wants nothing more than to be cast as one of the ten plagues in his Hebrew school's Passover play. But when his teacher assigns him the role of the matzoh, Sammy can't believe his bad luck. No Matzoh for Me! presents the Passover story of the Jewish holiday in a humorous, accessible, and kid-friendly way.

Description from Publisher


When it comes time to prepare for the Hebrew School's Passover play, Sammy and his friends already know which parts they want. Ben wants to be Moses, the hero of the story. Jack wants to be Pharoah, the bad guy. Sammy, on the other hand, wants to be neither -- he would prefer to be the plagues that God used to show how powerful He is. When the cast list was announced, Sammy was dismayed to learn that he was assigned to play the part of the Matzoh and announced that he would not participate in the play. After his mother convinces him that the matzoh was instrumental to the survival of the fleeing Israelites, and a little bit of creativity, Sammy show how Super the Matzoh can be. Children will be able to relate to Sammy's ups and downs about starring in a school production. The splashes of Hebrew throughout the text gives the story authenticity. An excellent story for preschoolers!

Lori's Description

Let's Have a Seder!

(Board Book)

By Miriam Sagasti
The author of Let's Celebrate Shabbat is back with another superb board book. Pictures are bright and detailed and encourage children to find something new with each reading. The illustrations feature a family participating in a Seder with their animal friends, including a lamb, panda, bear, dog, rabbit, and a donkey. Filled with simple, lyrical rhymes, this book will engage any toddler or preschooler!

Lori's Description

Where Is the Afikomen?

(Board Book)

By Judyth Saypol Groner
Look for the hidden matzah... is it under, on top, behind, or next to? A toddler treasure hunt.

from the Publisher


Toddlers will squeal with delight as they help the narrator search for the afikomen. She searches several places, but finds her grandmother's hat, wine, and a missing doll. An excellent choice for reading aloud in preparation for the holiday of Passover.

Lori's Description

What I Like About Passover

(Board Book)

By Varda Livney
Passover is here!
It's time for asking the four questions,
eating crunchy matza,
and finding the afikoman.
The Seder is so much fun.
What do you like best about Passover?

Description from Publisher

A new board book gives youngest readers a share of the Passover celebration. In Varda Livney's What I Like About Passover, cheerfully colored cartoons show a girl as she lists her favorite elements of the holiday, from the seder plate (its contents are labeled in Hebrew) and the Haggadah to "being with all of you!" (she sits amid a multigenerational crowd at the holiday table). Explanations of the rituals don't appear; this title is for those who, like the narrator, are at home with the holiday.

Description from Publishers Weekly


This charming board book features a young girl telling what she likes about her Passover celebration. In simple language, she lists things such as the Seder plate, Haggadah, the four questions, and crunchy matzah. Each page features a single concept and a bright, engaging cartoon illustration. There are no explanations for any of the terms, so the reader should be at least somewhat familar with the terminology. An excellent choice for reading aloud with toddlers and young preschoolers.

Lori's Description

Let's Ask Four Questions

(Board Book)

By Madeline Wikler
The traditional four questions asked by the youngest child at the Passover seder in board book format with amusing, colorful pictures.

Description from Publisher


This board book is an excellent way to get young children excited about their special role in the Passover Seder. The four questions are each asked in a simple text that young children can understand. Bright, colorful illustrations show how things are on "all other nights" and how they are during Passover. A perfect way to help prepare toddlers and preschoolers for the Four Questions or even a book for them to use to read along during part of the Seder service.

Lori's Description
Uncle Eli's Special-For-Kids Most Fun Ever Under-The-Table Passover Haggadah
Uncle Eli's Special-For-Kids
Most Fun Ever
Under-The-Table
Passover Haggadah
This special-for-kids, most fun ever under-the-table Haggada--as its subtitle declares--lives up to its name. Unabashedly borrowing from the style of Dr. Seuss, Eliezer Lorne Segal delightfully rhymes his way through the holiday, accompanied by fantastic, fire-breathing dragons, floating green pizza and matza carpets and a wild assortment of other creatures

Description by Hadassah Magazine

A story of Passover, young readers meet a cast of hilarious sages and unforgettable creatures as part of the events, personalities, and rituals of the Seder -- all told rhyming verse and whimsical color illustrations. Uncle Eli's Passover Haggadah is a unique, fun, beautifully presented, highly recommended transformation of the traditional Seder experience into an enchanting, memorable, heart inspiring, imagination stimulating format that is as lively as it is engaging.

Description from Midwest Book Review

In this one-of-a-kind children's Haggadah, the mysterious and mischievous Uncle Eli retells the story of the Passover. The book's enchanting rhymes and vivid illustrations breathe new life into the events, personalities, and rituals of the traditional Haggadah. You'll meet a cast of hilarious sages and unforgettable creatures including the Two-Headed Dray, Jacky the Juggler, Abie the Afikoman-thief, a six-legged moose named Harold, and Uncle Eli himself.

Uncle Eli's Special-for-Kids, Most Fun Ever, Under-the-Table Passover Haggadah brings adults and children alike a fresh perspective on Passover. Share your next Seder with Uncle Eli and make it more meaningful and fun for the children (and adults) at your table.

Description from Publisher


This Haggadah is the perfect way to add some spice and humor to your family's Seder. Using a Dr. Seuss-type rhyming scheme, Eliezer Lorne Segal manages to capture the essence of each section of the Seder while in a way that is sure to keep even the most fidgety child enthralled.

Lori's Description

Miriam's Cup
Miriam's Cup :
A Passover Story

By Fran Manushkin
Before the seder begins, Miriam Pinsky's mother tells her children the story of Passover and of Miriam's namesake. Looking back to when the Jews were slaves in Egypt, she talks about six-year-old Miriam's foretelling the birth of her brother Moses, "who will set our people free," and about the plagues and the Israelites' escape, about Miriam's leading her people in song to celebrate freedom, and about the well of clear spring water that G-d created in Miriam's honor. After the story ends, Miriam is given a crystal goblet to be filled with water during the seder to celebrate the prophet. The text and the lush double-spread watercolors, which are painted to reflect a child's perspective, are framed on a papyrus background. Each illustration bursts with movement, immersing readers and pre-readers alike in the sequence and drama of the story. Based on the Biblical story, Jewish commentary, legend, and tradition (all cited in the author's notes), this book will be magnificent for sharing as well as for teaching about holiday history. Music and lyrics from "Miriam's Song," written by Debbie Friedman, appear on the back of the jacket.

Description by Booklist


This story takes a look at the story of Exodus with a special focus on the role of Moses' sister Miriam. Every year, Miriam Pinsky's brother Elijah takes special pride in his namesake's role in the Seder. One year, Mama sits her family to tell the story of the prophet that Miriam was named after. Mama tells how Miriam played a part in encouraging her parents to have a third child (Moses), how she watched over her brother in the Nile and brought her mother to serve as his nursemaid, and how she used music to keep the Israelites' spirits up as they left Egypt. Bob Dacey's watercolors effectively capture the emotions felt by the modern and Biblical characters. Fran Manushkin's storytelling brings the Passover story to a new generation. This book is an excellent choice for families to share with young daughters.

Lori's Description

Passover Is Here! A Lift-the-Flap Book

By Bobby Pearlman
As a family remembers when Hebrew slaves were freed from Egypt a long time ago, a young boy participates in an age-old Passover tradition. Lift the flaps to discover why certain foods are eaten and why certain questions are asked in this celebration of freedom for the Hebrew people.

Description from Publisher


This lift-the-flap book effectively captures the joy and warmth of a family's Passover Seder. A young boy takes the reader through the preparations for his Seder (and his angst over remembering the Four Questions) through the nirzah, or the last prayer of the night. Some of the pages and flaps can be a bit busy with too much information crammed onto them, but generally the flaps are very effective. Most notably, is the flap showing the ancient Israelites celebrating the first Passover Seder on which lifts to reveal the modern family sitting at the table for their own Seder. Overall, an excellent choice for helping children to learn about the different parts of the Seder, or even to help follow along as their own Seder is going on.

Lori's Description


The Matzo Ball Boy

By Lisa Shulman
On the morning of the Passover seder, a lonely bubbe decides to make a matzo ball boy to keep herself company. Soon delicious smells waft from the bubbling pot, and when she lifts the lid to see if the matzo ball boy is done, out he jumps. "Oy!" she cries. "And where do you think you're going?" "I'm off to see the world, bubbe," replies the matzo ball boy. "Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me. I'm the matzo ball man!" Before long a yenta and her children, a rabbi, and a fox are all on a mad chase to catch the matzo ball boy, ending with his hilarious comeuppance. The familiar tale of the gingerbread man is updated with a twist as savory as a brimming bowl of the bubbe's chicken soup.

Description from Publisher


In a delightful fractured version of The Gingerbread Boy, a grandma (bubbe), preparing for the Passover seder, makes a matzo ball boy, who jumps out of the chicken soup and runs off to see the world. He's pursued by the bubbe, the rabbi, the tailor (schneider), a gossip (yenta), and others; he even outruns a fox, who has a voice "as smooth as schmaltz" (chicken fat). The ending has a little twist, and the occasional Yiddish words (defined in the glossary) add a warm, droll tone ("Oy! Oy! Come back") to the tale, which is picked up in the bright, mischievous pictures showing the fun of the chase. Shulman concludes with a brief note about the holiday. This might start a family post-seder storytelling tradition.

Description from Booklist


In this version of The Gingerbread Man, Bubbe decides to make herself a matzoh ball boy to keep her company over Passover. He escapes from the pot, and eventually has the entire town on his tail. Even a river is not enough to stop the Matzoh Ball Boy escape from a hungry fox. Finally, the Matzoh Ball Boy reaches the home of a poor husband and wife who offer him some unique hospitality. Soft watercolor illustrations complement the lyric text. Includes a glossary of Yiddish terminology and a summary of the Passover holiday. An excellent read-aloud story for preschoolers and early elementary children!

Lori's Description

Company's Coming :
A Passover Lift the Flap Book

By Joan Holub
It's Passover, and family and friends are coming over to celebrate. Young readers can lift the flaps and join the fun as the family in this lively story asks the Four Questions, samples the foods on the Seder plate, hunts for the Afikomen, and more. A great way to introduce the history and traditions of this important Jewish holiday to the very young.

Description from Publisher


This lift-the-flap book focuses on a family's Passover Seder. The text is simple and conversational and roughly follows the different sections of the Seder. The bright cartoonish illustrations are simple enough not to be overwhelming, yet are detailed enough to allow children to find something new every time. The flaps are quite sturdy and should be able to stand the test of time with most preschoolers. A glossary and Passover recipe are included at the end of the book. A wonderful read-aloud book for toddlers and preschoolers.

Lori's Description

The Kids' Catalog of Passover :

A Worldwide Celebration of Stories, Songs, Customs, Crafts, Food, and Fun
Inside this book is more than just matzah! The Jewish Publication Society does it again with another wondrous kids' catalog, this time featuring the holiday of Passover. This is not a haggadah but rather a companion to the ceremony, which can be used again and again for many years. Here are hundreds of new ways to celebrate Passover with your family, synagogue, and community. But the true joy of The Kids' Catalog of Passover is the book's multicultural flavor; traditions from around the world, from Ashkenazic, Sephardic, and Asiatic Jewish sources, are lovingly described.

Written in engaging, easy-to-use style, children of all ages will not only become better acquainted with Passover, they will also be encouraged to deepen their sense of K'lal Yisrael, the greater family of Jews around the world.

Children will be thrilled with all the activities, illustrations, and stories; parents and grandparents will value the comprehensive treatment of the Passover themes of freedom, liberation, and redemption. So,open this book and begin the telling of the Passover story anew!

Features include: * Songs, stories, and folktales * Recipes, crafts, riddles, games, and puzzles * Seder questions and ideas * Community projects for kids

Description from Publisher

The Littlest Frog

By Sylvia Rouss
Hot off the press is The Littlest Frog, a rousing new Passover book by Sylvia Rouss and illustrated by Holly Hannon. In The Littlest Frog, Rouss, the well-known author of the Sammy Spider holiday series, raises her whimsical story telling to new heights. In the Passover story told in the Haggadah at the Seder, the ten plagues delivered to Pharoh and the Egyptians to "let my people go", were no laughing matter. But in this rhyming yarn, silly, fun-loving frogs lighten the load and create child-friendly mischief, driving the Pharoh crazy. Emerald green frogs appear to jump off the pages in the bright, joyful illustrations. They smile as they happily leap all over Pharoh and his palace. There are even frogs wearing sun glasses! The book follows the endearing Littlest Frog who observes the sadness of the Jewish slaves working while Pharoh had fun. Children relate to the Littlest Frog's feelings with the repeating refrain "But the Littlest Frog was very afraid. He hid under the bed, and that's where he stayed." Until the Littlest Frog shows the courage of Moses and rises to the occasion - putting the evil Pharoh in his place! Rouss and Hannon have created an upbeat and appealing book to match the spirit of freedom celebrated at Passover. It is a perfect choice for the spring season - but its appeal will attract children beyond Passover.

Description from Jewish Journal

The author of the Sammy Spider series is back with a hilarious rendition of the ten plagues. Moses tells Pharoah that "bad things will happen if you don't let us go", but he ignores Moses' plea because he is Pharoah and nothing scares him. The next morning, he awakens to a frog on his nose and then discovers a sea of green when his palace is overrun with frogs. Pharoah becomes scared of all the frogs and is going nuts from all the noise. The frogs are all croaking loudly, that is all the frogs except "The Littlest Frog". The Littlest Frog is scared of Pharoah and spends his time hiding under the Pharoah's bed. When Pharoah is able to finally get rid of the frogs in the palace, he goes for what he thinks is a peaceful night. However, the peace and quiet also emboldens the Littlest Frog to go up to Pharoah and give a loud "Croak". That is the last straw for the Pharoah who finally decides to let the Israelites go free. Purists may be upset that Rouss's book ignores the other nine plagues. That should not detract from the delightfully fun rhymes that children will love to hear over and over again! The bright, cartoonish illustrations enhance the whimsical story. An excellent choice for reading aloud!

Lori's Description
Dinosaur On Passover
Dinosaur On Passover

By Diane Levin Rauchwerger
An eager and playful dinosaur comes to a young boy's house to join the boy and his family in celebrating Passover, causing mischief in the household.

Description from Publisher


Children will eagerly devour the adventures of the newest character to celebrate the Jewish holidays in the tradition of The Cat in the Hat. A boy describes how a dinosaur came to visit and celebrated Passover ... with a little bit of chaos to spare. The dinosaur's antics will be sure to delight readers of all ages. Recommended for toddler and preschool readers.

Lori's Description

This is Passover

(Board Book)

By Santiago Cohen
The traditional elements of Passover are presented, one by one, as the Seder table is specially set for the whole family to enjoy Passover together. This rhythmic read-aloud celebrates all of the elements that make this Jewish holiday bright. Bright, folk-art illustrations reflect the warmth and intimacy of the holiday in a book that will familiarize children with the traditions of the Passover Seder.

Description from Publisher


The author of It's Hanukkah! is back with a Passover themed entry. This charming board book borrows from the style of "The House That Jack Built" to explain the key parts of the Passover Seder. As each item is added to the narrative on the left side of the page, the object is added to the illustration of the table on the right side of the page. Eventually, the entire family congregates to begin the Seder. Children will love the predictability of the additive rhymes and will be engaged by the search for the new objects on the Passover table. An excellent choice for families to read aloud together.

Lori's Descriptiotn

Too Many Cooks : A Passover Parable

Bubbe is interrupted while she is making charoses for the Passover seder. While she chats on the phone, family members wander into the kitchen and add their own "special ingredient" to spice up the mixture. As a result of too many cooks, the "charoses is atrocious!" An amusing introduction to the festive Passover meal.

Description from Publisher


This delightful tale takes the cliche "too many cooks spoiled the broth" and adds a Passover flair. Bubbe is in the middle of making charoses for the family's seder, when she gets a phone call from her best friend. As she chats on the phone, various family members decide that since Bubbe's charoses is always a little bland, they will add their own "special ingredient". Not surprisingly, when it comes time to taste the charoses during the Seder, the charoses is less-than-stellar. Children will be engaged by the repeating text as each new family member adds to Bubbe's charoses and will delight in imagining how horrific the final charoses must taste. A superb choice for reading aloud to preschoolers and young elementary children.

-Lori's Description

Pearl's Passover :
A Family Celebration Through Stories, Recipes, Crafts, and Songs

By Jane Breskin Zalben
Awards:
  • Sydney Taylor Honor Book
A large family, neighbors, and a rabbi (all portrayed in loving domestic detail as sheep) play a role in the stories, recipes, crafts, and songs featured here. Zalben individualizes her characters through humorous touches that make the rather large cast easy to distinguish. The colored-pencil and watercolor illustrations of the vignettes are charming, and those that accompany the clear directions given for crafts and cooking are both helpful and inviting. Children will enjoy reading about Pearl and Avi and their twin cousins, Sophie and Harry ("the two terrors from Teaneck"); adults will appreciate the way that essential information about the history, meaning, and customs of Passover is interwoven throughout the stories and activities. Similar to Pearl's Eight Days of Chanukah, this book will be welcome in religious and secular libraries.

Description from School Library Journal

That adorable yet very human little lamb is back and getting ready for Passover. Pearl is not above sniping at her twin cousins, the "two terrors of Teaneck," but she is at bottom a very caring sister, daughter, and cousin. And an enthusiastic participant in the Passover rituals. From the search for chametz to the Seder meal (no leg of lamb on the menu) to the cries of "Next year in Jerusalem," Pearl and her family undertake a thorough examination of the joys, requirements, and meaning of Passover. Zalben's (Don't Go!, p. 950, etc.) sweet watercolor, gold-leaf, and colored-pencil renderings convey the warmth of this family of sheep, although a full-page illustration of Moses parting the Red Sea is a jarring stylistic departure from the rest of the illustrations. The text is interspersed with recipes for Passover dishes, including both an Ashkenazi and Sephardic recipe for haroset, as well as craft projects for making such items as a Seder plate, Miriam's timbrels, and a placemat of an interesting, although highly speculative, map of the route of the Exodus from Egypt. This quite comprehensive look at the Passover holiday also contains a list of the 15 steps of the Seder, words and music for the song portion, and a glossary of terms used in the text. It's an excellent and light-hearted resource for both parents and religious schools-and the kids will like it too.

Description from Kirkus Reviews

It's time for Passover and Pearl and her brother, Avi, are helping to prepare the house for company. Grandma, Grandpa, Aunt Rachel, Uncle Solly, and "the two terrors from Teaneck," cousins Harry and Sophie, are coming to spend the holiday at Pearl's house. Pearl frets about getting along with her cousins. Her brother, Avi, is anxious about reciting the Four Questions at the Seder. But as soon as the guests arrive, Pearl and her cousins are too busy baking matzoh, making Passover place cards, matzoh covers, and preparing the Seder plate to worry about anything. As Pearl's family comes together for Passover, she learns the importance of family and faith and finds out that the real meaning of the holiday only grows stronger when it is shared with loved ones.

Jane Breskin Zalben's intricately detailed, jewel-like illustrations are a delight to the eye and evoke the warmth and joy of Passover. Easy-to-follow instructions and recipes are included for each activity, making this ideal for families who want to include their children in their holiday festivities.

Description from Publisher


This charming anthology tells the story of Pearl, her brother Avi, and the rest of their family as they celebrate Passover together. Zalben has created characters which children will easily relate to. They fight, they get into trouble, but most of all, they love being together. Warm illustrations featuring the family of sheep enhance Zalben's story. The book also features crafts, receipes, songs, and activities to enhance the Passover celebration. A superb choice for preschoolers.

Lori's Description
Happy Passover, Rosie

Happy Passover, Rosie
In this complement to Beni's First Chanukah , Beni's cousin Rosie celebrates the first Passover seder she will remember. Rosie and her brother Max help hunt for stray bread crumbs; Rosie recites the Four Questions for the first time; then, to top all, she finds the afikomen and wins the prize from Grandpa. Soft, decorative illustrations, similar in style to the illustrations in some Haggadot and depicting a warm, loving bear family highlight this narration of a family Seder. The fear Rosie feels when she believes Elijah has really come (it is only Grandpa) is a nice touch.

description by Publishers Weekly

Please note that Goldie's Purim can also be found in the Beni's Family Treasury : Stories for the Jewish Holidays collection


My First Passover Board Book

By Clare Lister
New title in the top selling My First series that continue our focus on early language development.

Introduce babies and toddlers to the most important holiday in the Jewish year with this delightful addition to the My First books. Helping your child count the candles on the menorah and pointing out the Hebrew letters on a dreidel will aid in building early learning skills while the scenes of children acting out the Passover story give insight into the holiday's traditions.

Description from Publisher

From the Haggadah to the plague of locusts to matzo ball soup, Passover is filled with many intriguing traditions, stories, and foods. Very young children will love learning about this most important Jewish holiday with DK's extra-sturdy little board book. Crisp photos and preschool age-appropriate language tell the story of Passover, and describe Seder preparations, a song (with musical notation), and some of the colors of Passover (blue yarmulke, green parsley, red wine, silver candlestick). Scenes of costumed children acting out the story of Passover will help readers grasp the historical significance and rituals of the holiday. Along with its companion title, My First Hannukah Board Book, this handy guide will be a real favorite for kids who are beginning to ask "Why is this night different from all others?"

Description from Amazon.com

It's Seder Time

By Latifa Berry Kropf
A preschool class demonstrates getting ready for Passover. Watch as they prepare matzah and charoset, the table and seder plate, and participate in the seder complete with the Four Questions and the afikomen. A perfect companion to It's Challah Time!, It's Shofar Time!, It's Hanukkah Time!, It's Purim Time!, and It's Sukkah Time!

Description from Publisher


Photographs of preschoolers preparing for a Passover Seder highlight this delightful holiday book. The children get rid of chometz, make matzah and charoset, and set the table with all the ritual objects for the Seder. Finally, they enjoy going through the Seder service and acting out the story of the Exodus. The text is simple and conversational. The photographs are of an actual preschool class and the authenticity won't be lost on readers who will relate to the subjects in the pictures. The book includes a description of Passover and directions for how to make the Torah masks that are used by the students in the book. An excellent pick for preschool-aged children.

Lori's Description

A Taste for Noah

By Susan Remick Topek
Noah is worried! His class is preparing for the model seder. Soon they will make charoset, and Noah is sure he won't like the "mushy" mixture. But he does like apples...and he does like nuts...The third in the Noah series.

from the Publisher


The lovable preschooler Noah is back for another Jewish holiday tale. Passover is rapidly approaching and Noah's class is preparing for a model Seder. They are making everything themselves. Noah, however, is apprehensive -- he does not like charoset. He has never tried it because it is "mushy", but he just knows he won't like it. The class goes through the week getting ready for the Seder. They make Haggadahs, Kiddush cups, and matzah. Every day he worries that they will be making charoset tomorrow. When it finally comes time to make charoset, Noah's friends work out a plan to get Noah to realize that charoset isn't so bad after all. Young readers love Noah because he is just like them. Children will relate to Noah's angst over the prospect of a project he doesn't think he will like. Parents can use the story as a stepping stone to a discussion about trying new things. An excellent Passover story for young children.

Lori's Description

Shlemiel Crooks

By Anna Olswanger
Awards:
  • 2006 Sydney Taylor Book Award

    "In the middle of the night on a Thursday, two crooks--onions should grow in their navels--drove their horse and wagon to the saloon of Reb Elias Olschwanger, at the corner of 14th and Carr streets in St. Louis. This didn’t happen yesterday. It was 1919." So begins Anna Olswanger’s charming folktale Shlemiel Crooks, the story of Reb Elias and the thieves who try to steal his Passover wine. Based on a true story, Shlemiel is an imaginative introduction for young children to the history of Passover, as Pharaoh and a town of Jewish immigrants play tug-of-war with wine made from grapes left over from the exodus from Egypt. A modern-day parable, Shlemiel has a music all its own. No other children’s book has Pharaoh’s ghost coming back to "pull one over on the Jews," nosy neighbors making a "shtuss" outside, and a talking horse that sounds like it has a "little indigestion." In its Yiddish-inflected English, punctuated by amusing curses, young readers hear the language of a Jewish community of another time, while delighting to brilliant illustrations on every page.

    Description from Publisher


    Shtetl humor and magic realism come to St. Louis in 1919 in this wry Pesach story based on the experience of the author's great-grandfather, who sold kosher wines. While Reb Elias is at synagogue leading a Talmud discussion (OK, an argument) about the first Passover (when the Israelites were booted out of Egypt), Pharaoh's ghost arrives in St. Louis, still sneaking around and trying to put one over on the Jews. He persuades a couple of crooks ("onions should grow in their navels") to steal Reb Elias' special Passover wine, but with help from the prophet Elijah and a talking horse, the bumbling thieves are chased away by noisy neighbors. The boldly colored woodcuts give life to the city neighborhood, the foolish villains, and the lively arguments as well as to the daring Israelites, escaping across the desert 3000 years ago. The best thing here, however, is Olswanger's Yiddish storyteller's voice, particularly the hilarious curses she weaves into the story: "His teeth should fall out, except one, then he could have a toothache." Great for reading aloud.

    Description from Booklist


    This updated version of the Passover story is based on a real-life incident that took place in St. Louis in 1919. Reb Elias Olschwanger decides to order a special shipment of Kosher wine from Israel. After all, no wine, no Elijah's cup, no way for the Jews of St. Louis to learn of the arrival of the Messiah (if he should come in 1919). Unbeknownst to Reb Elias, the ghost of Pharoah managed to convince some crooks (from the part of St. Louis where you wouldn't want to find yourself walking alone at night) to steal Reb Elias's wine. But a combination of magic and Jews looking after one another manages to save the day. Anna Olswanger put together a unique story and infuses it with humor and a conversational storytelling style. A superb choice for reading aloud.

    Lori's Description

  • Matzah Meals: A Passover Cookbook for Kids

    By Judy Tabs and Barbara Steinberg
    This simple cookbook includes lots of great recipes for the young Passover cook. You'll also find instructions for preparing the seder and craft ideas for decorating the seder table.

    Description from Publisher


    This cookbook is a perfect tool to keep children involved in Passover preparations. The 70 recipes are listed as meat, diary, or pareve. Tools needed are clearly labeled and each recipe is given a level of difficulty ranging from one pots (no cooking or baking required) to three pans (hot stove or oven used; adult supervision required). The recipes themselves are creative and definitely geared towards picky young eaters. Some sample recipes include: Unsandwiches, Baby Moses Salad, E-Z Tsimmes, Peach Kugel, Matzah Pizza, Tostados, Matzah Egg Foo Young, Hawaiian Matzah Fry, T.V. Munch, and Chocolate Egg Cream.

    Lori's Description

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